22

May

19h30

Children of War

Between 1961 and 1975, about one million Portuguese men were sent to three battle fronts in an attempt to sustain a dying colonial empire. There is a generation of children that grew up with stories of this war, some already told, others more or less hidden. Over the years, the photo albums were put away in the attics of many Portuguese homes.

What did these fathers say about their war experiences?

What can one tell a child? Have those men told their Por­tu­guese chil­dren that they have Afri­can brothers whom they’ve never met?

In pla­ces where there was war, Afri­can women fell preg­nant of these for­mer mili­tary. At the time, some cal­led them soft Por­tu­guese, today they are known as chil­dren of the wind. They are men and women who were chil­dren and who are now adults, and who con­ti­nue to ask “Who is my Tuga father?”

Cata­rina Gomes

CHILDREN HERE AND CHILDREN THERE

CATARINA GOMES

A jour­na­list of the news­pa­per Público for 17 years and author of the book Dad, were you afraid? (Matéria-Prima edi­ti­ons) which fea­tu­res twelve sto­ries about the colo­nial war viewed by chil­dren of for­mer com­ba­tants, she too, the daugh­ter of a vete­ran. This book led to the arti­cle Chil­dren of the Wind. In 2015, the jour­na­list recei­ved the AMI-Journalism against the indi­fe­rence award with two arti­cles: one about the disap­pe­a­rance of a father with Alzheimer’s dise­ase; and another about chil­dren sepa­ra­ted from their leprosy parents.

 

THE GRANDCHILDREN THAT SALAZAR DID NOT HAVE

MARGARIDA CALAFATE RIBEIRO

With a PhD in Por­tu­guese Stu­dies by King’s Col­lege Lon­don, she is a researcher-coordinator in Social Stu­dies Cen­tre at the Uni­ver­sity of Coim­bra and res­pon­si­ble for the Chair Edu­ardo Lou­renço at the Uni­ver­sity of Bologna and sup­port of Ins­ti­tuto Camões. Amongst her publi­ca­ti­ons high­light goes the books Africa in the femi­nine: Por­tu­guese women and the Colo­nial War, A His­tory of return: Empire, Colo­nial War and post-colonialism and also, together with Roberto Vec­chi, Antho­logy of the poe­tic memory of the colo­nial war. Between 2007 and 2011, she coor­di­na­ted the pro­ject Chil­dren of the colo­nial war: post-memory and repre­sen­ta­ti­ons.

 

OF WHICH WAR DO WE SPEAK TO OUR CHILDREN ABOUT?

LUÍS GRAÇA

With a degree in Soci­o­logy and a doc­to­rate in public health by Uni­ver­si­dade Nova de Lis­boa, he is a rese­ar­cher and uni­ver­sity pro­fes­sor, and direc­tor of the Revista Por­tu­guesa de Saúde Pública (Por­tu­guese Jour­nal of Public Health) since 2007. He has a per­so­nal web page on health and work since 1999, and deve­lops the blog Luís Graça & Cama­ra­das da Guiné, since 2004, a rare case of sha­ring memo­ries and affec­ti­ons among for­mer com­ba­tants of the colo­nial war, com­po­sed of about 700 members.

 

RIGHT TO KNOWLEDGE OF GENETIC ORIGINS?

RAFAEL VALEREIS

Guest assis­tant at the Faculty of Law of the Uni­ver­sity of Coim­bra and rese­ar­cher at the Bio­me­di­cal Law Cen­ter at the Law School of the Uni­ver­sity of Coim­bra. He com­pri­ses the team of the Per­ma­nent Obser­va­tory for Adop­tion under the Family Law Cen­tre of the Faculty of Law of Coim­bra. He is the author of The Right to Kno­wledge of Gene­tic Ori­gins, published in book form by Coim­bra Edi­tora in 2008.