23

May

19h30

The Past In The Present, The Heritage Of Colonialism In The Portuguese Society And Culture

MODERATOR: GENERAL D

More than four decades since 25 Abril 1974 (revolution), why does it continue to be crucial to speak of the colonial past?

Was there a real bre­ach with the past and with all its inhe­ri­tance? Why insist on myths and taboo sub­jects? Is there pater­na­lism and tute­lage of the other or a new spe­ech with old clothes?

The pro­po­sed the­mes are inten­ded to pro­voke reflec­tion about what, con­ve­ni­en­tly, is still wai­ting for an urgent debate.

GENERAL D

Born in Mozam­bi­que in 1971. He found in rap his form of expres­sion and, in 1990, orga­ni­zed the first fes­ti­val of this kind in Por­tu­gal, at Incrí­vel Alma­dense in Almada, an ini­ti­a­tive that inclu­ded the par­ti­ci­pa­tion of vari­ous icons of the Por­tu­guese urban cul­ture of the period such as the Black Com­pany, the Líde­res da Nova Men­sa­gem, or Afri­can Power. A few years later, Gene­ral D became the first nati­o­nal rap­per
to sign a record contract.


AFRICA AND AFRICANS IN PORTUGAL, BETWEEN MYTHS AND REALITY

MARIA PAULA MENESES

Born in Mozam­bi­que, she has a Master’s Degree in His­tory from the Uni­ver­sity of St. Peters­burg (Rus­sia) and a PhD in Anth­ro­po­logy from Rut­gers Uni­ver­sity (USA). She is a rese­arch coor­di­na­tor at the Cen­tre for Social Stu­dies of the Uni­ver­sity of Coim­bra and inte­gra­tes the Stu­dies Cen­tre on Demo­cracy, Citi­zenship and Law. She tea­ches in seve­ral doc­to­ral pro­grams at the Cen­tre for Social Stu­dies, and coor­di­na­tes the doc­to­ral pro­gram in Post-colonialism and glo­bal citi­zenship. The books and arti­cles she has published in seve­ral coun­tries, as well as rese­arch topics, address issues such as post-colonialism, legal issues and iden­tity pro­ces­ses within the Afri­can context.


DECOLONIZE HISTORY, URGENTLY

ANA PAULA TAVARES

From Huila, Angola, she is a poet and an his­to­rian. She has a master’s degree in Afri­can Lite­ra­tu­res of Por­tu­guese Lan­guage by the Faculty of Arts, Uni­ver­sity of Lis­bon. She coor­di­na­ted the Rese­arch Bureau of the Nati­o­nal Cen­tre for His­to­ri­cal Docu­men­ta­tion in Luanda. She is cur­ren­tly tea­ching at the Catho­lic Uni­ver­sity and a col­la­bo­ra­tor at RDP Africa, where she pre­sents a wee­kly chro­ni­cle of His­tory, Lite­ra­ture and Cul­ture. Inte­gra­ting Gera­ção de 80 – a novís­sima gera­ção – (Gene­ra­tion of the 80 – a new gene­ra­tion) she is one of the Ango­lan female voi­ces that has always mani­fes­ted a great con­cern for the sta­tus of women in her country.


HOW AND WHY RACISM SURVIVED THE 25 OF ABRIL

SÉRGIO DUNDÃO

Born in Luanda, he has a degree and a Mas­ters in Poli­ti­cal Sci­ence and Inter­na­ti­o­nal Rela­ti­ons from the Faculty of Social and Human Sci­en­ces of Uni­ver­si­dade Nova and deve­lo­ped the the­sis Armed Con­flict and Buil­ding the State: A com­pa­ri­son between Angola, Mozam­bi­que and Guinea-Bissau. He inte­gra­tes the Gueto Plat­form and is dedi­ca­ted to issues of the social and poli­ti­cal situ­a­tion of blacks in Por­tu­gal and the rela­ti­onship of the Por­tu­guese State with these com­mu­ni­ties, the ine­qua­li­ties that arise, as exem­pli­fied by the resi­dents and chil­dren of the neigh­bourhood of Santa Filo­mena, Ama­dora. Cur­ren­tly he tea­ches at the Ins­ti­tute of Social Sci­en­ces and Inter­na­ti­o­nal Rela­ti­ons in Angola.